5 Reads to Help You Do the Work That Matters Most

At Freedom we are lucky to have many of our users write about their experience. From tweets to published articles – the Freedom community is buzzing with productivity strategy, advice, and experiments for a more focused, fulfilled life.

This week’s articles focus on deep work and doing the work that matters most. This type of work requires more mental energy than checking email or other simple tasks, but in the long run will help you achieve meaningful results for your personal goals, development, and career. Too often this type of work gets neglected due to distractions, procrastination, or simple, time-eating tasks – so here are a few articles to help you focus on the work that matters.

FIVE RULES TO MAKE ME ACTUALLY WRITE | Jake Knapp

Jake Knapp just quit his job at Google Ventures to focus on his writing. Although now free from his prior commitments, Knapp faces a new challenge to maintain his productivity now that he no longer has a formal work structure. Read more to discover the five rules he plans to use to keep him productive and accountable in his newfound freedom.

 

HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR WORKDAY | Phyllis Korkki

The problem with productivity advice is that in most cases, one size does not fit all. Luckily Phyllis Korkki has broken down tried and tested productivity techniques that can be adapted to all types of workers and personalities. Whether you’re a multitasker, procrastinator, internet junkie, workaholic, or all of the above, this article has got specific advice tailored to your unique productivity needs.

 

MAINTAINING FOCUS WHILE WRITING | Kathy Edens

Writing isn’t easy. That’s why when many of us try to do it, we get caught up in a world of digital distraction and procrastination. Luckily, our friends at ProWritingAid found a solution – Freedom. Writing may never be easy, but using the right tools can make all the difference. Read more to learn how Edens used Freedom to cut her writing time in half.

 

HOW DEEP WORK CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE FOREVER | Michael Hyatt

According to a 2015 study, distractions steal 749 hours of productivity per worker each year. This is why Georgetown computer scientist, Cal Newport is trying to encourage a shift toward deep work. Deep work is uninterrupted work of the highest priority, and which often requires the most brain power. Read more to learn about the three ways you can start to banish distractions and get more deep work done.

 

LEARNING TO BE ALONE IN A WORLD OF CONSTANT CONNECTION | Kirstie Pursey

Do you want to be more productive, focused, and creative? Turns out that the way to improve in all three of these areas might be less complicated than you think. The solution might be as simple as spending time alone. As our world becomes more connected, the time that we spend alone or bored has become increasingly rare. Unfortunately, this leaves many of us without much time to reflect, learn about ourselves, or be spontaneously creative. Click the link above to learn more about how saving time to be alone can help you.

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